Invasion! (Penn State Ag Science Magazine)

Check out this article on invasive species in the Penn State Ag Science Magazine!  It features quotes from Art Gover, keynote speaker at our 2016 Annual Meeting.

Scientists and extension educators in the college battle invasive species.

Source: Invasion (Penn State Ag Science Magazine)


From Nature.org: 10 Weird Ways You Could Be Spreading Invasive Species

Could you be spreading invasive species without realizing it?  Check out this list to find out!

From artificial Christmas trees to running shoes, we look at some of the ways you could be spreading invasive species.

Source: 10 Weird Ways You Could Be Spreading Invasive Species

A Call to Action: 2016–2018 NISC Management Plan

managementplanblog_1

“The NISC Management Plan is a call to collective action. It enables us to know where to place our priorities and where to invest in the future. The threats invasive species pose to American assets and security warrant an urgent response backed by the full commitment of NISC and its partners.”

Visit https://www.doi.gov/invasivespecies/call-action-2016-2018-nisc-management-plan to download the full management plan.


ALERT: Emerald Ash Borer is CONFIRMED in Delaware

Source: emeraldashborer.info

Source: emeraldashborer.info

From Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA) Facebook page:

“A destructive, invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in Delaware, making it the 28th state to have found the insect.

The statewide impact is expected to be minimal, as ash trees make up only around two percent of Delaware’s tree stock and the state has been preparing for more than a decade.

“Because this was not unexpected, we have been working for several years with cities, towns and civic groups on plans to manage and replaceash trees,” said Dr. Faith Kuehn, administrator of DDA’s Plant Industries Section, which oversees EAB detection, control and prevention in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Delaware will also be added to a federal quarantine already in 27 other states restricting the interstate shipment of all ash wood and wood products – ash nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost and chips – as well as hardwood firewood of all species. Some shipment out of state may be permitted if certain requirements are met and a federal permit is issued.

State forestry and plant health officials are providing advice to homeowners, municipalities and civic groups at de.gov/ashtrees, where they can find information, fact sheets, photographs and links to other resources.”

Visit http://dda.delaware.gov/plantind/eab.shtml for more information.


Controlling Japanese Barberry Helps Stop Spread of Tick-Borne Diseases

A 2012 article from UConn Today about the connection between Japanese Barberry infestations and densities of Lyme-infected ticks:

From UConn Today-- Jeffrey Ward, chief scientist in the department of forestry and horticulture at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiement Station demonstrates the use of a propane torch. (Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Ward)

From UConn Today– Jeffrey Ward, chief scientist in the department of forestry and horticulture at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiement Station demonstrates the use of a propane torch. (Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Ward)

“In addition to attracting earthworms, the Barberry creates a perfect, humid environment for ticks. Williams recites the numbers. ‘When we measure the presence of ticks carrying the Lyme spirochete (Borreliaburgdorferi) we find 120 infected ticks where Barberry is not contained, 40 ticks per acre where Barberry is contained, and only 10 infected ticks where there is no Barberry.'”


Emerging Threats: Amazon and eBay hosted ads for banned invasive species | Environment | The Guardian

EBay posting for Giant Salvinia

eBay posting for Giant Salvinia

“In the US, the Department of Agriculture has banned all transport and sale of giant salvinia across state borders. Despite these restrictions, at least four patches were sold in the past year on eBay by a seller in Hawaii who ships anywhere in the US.”

Source: Amazon and eBay hosted ads for banned invasive species | Environment | The Guardian


 

 

Maryland: Statewide Eyes Program Calls on Citizens to Help Find Invasive Plants

“Citizens and scientists are working together to tackle the problem of invasive plants on state lands through the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ new Statewide Eyes program. Statewide Eyes is seeking people interested in identifying and mapping invasive plants that threaten ecologically sensitive sites.”

Source: Statewide Eyes Program Calls on Citizens to Help Find Invasive Plants


Fishermen Battle Invasive ‘Frankenfish’ Snakeheads

From National Geographic: Fishermen Battle Invasive ‘Frankenfish’ Snakeheads

“The large Asian invaders are spreading throughout the Chesapeake system, but people are beating them back.”

 

Snakehead

–From National Geographic


Delaware’s Most UNWANTED

Check out this article from Wednesday’s News Journal! It features an interview with our Chair, Ashley Peebles, and photos from our Education/Outreach Co-chair, Greg Gagliano!

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Maryland Invasive Plant Advisory Committee Announces New Regulation

Way to go, Maryland!

A press release from the Maryland Department of Agriculture:


 

MDDAMD

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                         CONTACT: Julie Oberg, 410-841-5888
Jason Schellhardt, 410-841-5744

Maryland Invasive Plant Advisory Committee Announces New Regulation

ANNAPOLIS, MD (February 10, 2016) – The Maryland Department of Agriculture has announced proposed regulations regarding the classification of certain invasive plant species on a tiered system, as well as new definitions, conditions under which the Secretary’s approval may be given for otherwise prohibited activities under the Invasive Plant Prevention and Control law, and mechanisms for listing and delisting species. The department’s overall goal is to prevent invasive species from entering or spreading further in the state. See the department’s Proposed and Emergency Regulation webpage.

These proposed regulations are open for public comment through March 7. Comments may be sent to Carol Holko, Assistant Secretary for Plant Industries, Maryland Department of Agriculture at (410) 841-5870, or carol.holko@maryland.gov.

“This regulation would require signage near Tier 2 invasive plants in retail displays instead of prohibiting their sale,” said Assistant Secretary Holko. “It would be one of the first regulations of its kind, and a valuable step in preventing invasive plant species from causing environmental harm in the state.”

Initial regulations were promulgated in January 2013 establishing a scientific weed risk assessment protocol for classifying invasive plants as “Tier 1” or “Tier 2.” The plants listed in the current regulations under review are based on these assessments. The full assessment reports are available on the program’s webpage at http://mda.maryland.gov/invasiveplants.

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Follow Maryland Department of Agriculture on Twitter @MdAgDept